Category Archives: Foodways and Creativity

3D Food Printing Project at the Museums and the Web Asia 2015

(Photos from the conference added on 27 October 2015.)

Our research paper Museums as creative labs: 3D food printing inspired by culinary heritage in the context of makerspaces will be presented at the MWA2015: Museums and the Web Asia 2015 conference, 5-8 October 2015, Melbourne.

In this paper we explore how a museum can be used as a laboratory for engaging audiences in new food production and new reinterpretations of culinary heritage in the context of makerspaces. We explore the concept of the creative reinterpretation of culinary heritage through 3D printing – in this case of Slovenian Australians: a 3D printed Slovenian potica cake. We anticipate that this introduction to the reinterpretation of culinary heritage through 3D printing can provide an innovative thought-piece for future research investigations.

The paper prepared for MWA2015 and published at the conference website is also available below:

Kaja Antlej, Angelina Russo
Museums as creative labs: 3D food printing inspired by heritage in the context of makerspaces
Introduction

The preparation and consumption of local and global foods has never been more topical than it is today. Food security and nutrition issues explored at a global level (EXPO 2015: Feeding the Planet, Energy for Life), while the skills and practices associated with domestic food preparation are the subject of multiple reality TV-programs. Popular locally produced programs such as My Kitchen Rules and Master Chef (Bodey, 2015) are part of global franchises while, in the UK, The Great British Bake-Off 2014 grand final drew more audience numbers (12.3 million) than the World Cup final (12.1 million) (Malnick, 2014). At the same time, new museums specifically dedicated to food and communities, but not affiliated with food industry, such as MOFAD (Museum of Food and Drink), are also arising (Merritt, 2015).

In 2012 the Australian National Museum led a project entitled “Urban Farming and the Agricultural Show” which explored how agricultural shows helped to shape understandings of the relationships between food, people and place. In the following year (2013) they released “Food Stories”, a program of digital content creation and publication, which allowed audiences to share their food stories. In terms of re-use of heritage and creative participation of audiences, both initiatives represent a relatively traditional approach to the interpretation of food production and culinary heritage.

In this paper we explore opportunities for museums to become creative labs pursuing creative reinterpretations of cultural content through the use of new digital fabrication technologies. 3D food printing is one of those technologies.

3D food printing (Cohen et al., 2009), first introduced in 2006 (Lipson & Kurman, 2013) is bringing another dimension to the curatorial endeavor. A 3D food printer is a special 3D printing system which enables the construction of parts using edible materials mainly from viscous materials (e.g. cheese, paté, dough, chocolate) and powdered substances (e.g. sugar).

In this research we explore how a museum can be used as a laboratory for engaging audiences in new food production and resultant reinterpretations of culinary heritage. A traditional cuisine is a rich source of creativity, as evidenced through the recent 3D food printing projects. See Foodini (Molitch-Hou, 2015), ChefJet (Ngo, 2015), Bocusini (Biggs, 2015), Pancake Bot (Senese, 2015), Barilla’s 3D pasta printer at EXPO 2015 (Alec, 2015), Australian project EdiPulse (Khot et al., 2015) and many other initiatives.

However, the potential of 3D food printing for the creative reinterpretation of culinary heritage in a context of a makerspace (Dougherty, 2013) in a museum at which visitors can be creatively engaged, has yet to be explored. Many burgeoning makerspaces, equipped with rudimentary digital fabrication facilities, are located in community spaces and science/cultural centers. Due to their rich resources, makerspaces are also entering into museums.

In New York, NEW INC, the first museum-led incubator, demonstrates the potential for museums to act as creative laboratories. This innovative platform was established by the New Museum in 2013 to support creative professionals not only with their lab-like co-working space, but also with resources from the New Museum’s collection of contemporary art.

Additionally, a few examples of 3D food printing in museums have already been introduced. For instance, in Sydney by Vivid Ideas 2013 and through the Eat the Collection project at the Powerhouse Museum (Museum of Applied arts and Sciences) collaborated with ten creative industry professionals on re-use of some of the museum objects (Kinski, 2013). During the public event, their reinterpretations were 3D printed in chocolate and visitors were invited to eat them.

Culinary heritage of Slovenian Australians

Throughout 2015 we conducted a research project exploring how digital technologies can aid younger generations of Slovenian Australians to preserve and communicate Slovenian culinary heritage in Australia. The central aim of the research was to explore how their creative participation in culinary heritage could enhance notions of identity as Slovenian Australians. Culinary heritage has long been connected with notions of identity and together they form an important part of intangible heritage and a universal way of bringing people together.

Throughout the course of the research, 18 in-depth interviews were conducted among members (all generations and ages) of Slovenian ethnic groups in Australian cities. It was discovered that, for many of them, traditional Slovenian cuisine is still an important part of their lives. Since most traditional Slovenian dishes (especially desserts) require a great deal of preparation time, together with advanced cooking skills and knowledge, they are usually prepared by members of the older generations (mothers, grandmothers) for family gatherings during holidays or other special events. Therefore, it was decided that a Slovenian dessert would be chosen as a test case for creative reinterpretation through 3D printing.

A creative reinterpretation of culinary heritage: A 3D printed Slovenian potica

Potica is one of the most typical Slovenian festive cakes. Among gibanica and štruklji, it is one of the most popular desserts also by Slovenian migrants in Australia. Potica (Figure 1) is made from a bread dough and filling such as walnut, tarragon, poppy seed and cottage cheese. It forms a large hollow cylinder and when cut, every slice has a nut-roll style shape.
Figure 1: Slices of a poppy seed potica made by Jožica Koštrica, a Slovenian-Australian cooking expert from Canberra (Photo: Kaja Antlej).

Figure 1: Slices of a poppy seed potica made by Jožica Koštrica, a Slovenian-Australian cooking expert from Canberra (Photo: Kaja Antlej).

The characteristic potica has a central spiral, but through 3D food printing, potica can be created in a multitude of different shapes and can incorporate forms inspired by other Slovenian motifs (Razboršek, 1992) such as hearts, plants and flowers.

Using potica as a test case, we explored the notion that museum visitors could creatively engage in the reinterpretation of the dessert by accessing digital fabrication technologies through museum makerspaces. The research hypothesized that participants in a museum (e.g. Immigration Museum) could use a special app to design their own image of a potica slice. The newly created image could be generated into a 3D model (Figure 2) and prepared for 3D printing. Since a two material (two syringes) 3D printer is needed, we propose to use Scientist 3D printer or a similar machine from Seraph Robotics, together with their software for generating multi-material print jobs from a single standard STL file. This 3D printer also represents a further development of a Fab@Home model 2, which was successfully used for 3D printing a prism-shaped cookie with a chocolate letter “C” in the interior (Lipton, et al., 2010).
Figure 2: Visualisation of a 3D printed <em>potica</em> cake (concept) (3D model: Kaja Antlej; texturisation and rendering: Nina Oman).

Figure 2: Visualization of a 3D printed potica cake (concept) (3D model: Kaja Antlej; texturization and rendering: Nina Oman).

Conclusions and Further Work

The conceptual framework for creative reinterpretation of culinary heritage is one which requires further investigation. While conceptually, a 3D model of potica can be created and print files produced, there is much testing of dough and filling which would need to be carried out. The opportunity to use museum collection knowledge to aid this experimentation offers a unique opportunity to bring together collections, culinary heritage and digital fabrication in a new space of investigation and innovation. We contend that museum visitor engagement in the process of experimentation would go some way towards modelling how museum makerspaces can enact the notion of a creative laboratory. However, we underpin our work by considering the opportunities afforded museums to act as creative laboratories, providing makerspaces which engage audiences in digital fabrication with access to significantly more expensive highly specialized equipment such as 3D food printers.

Acknowledgements

The research has been made possible through the support of an Australian government 2015 Endeavour Research Fellowship (Postdoctoral Research) of Kaja Antlej at the Centre for Creative and Cultural Research, Faculty of Arts and Design, University of Canberra under supervision of Professor Angelina Russo and provided by the Australian Government Department of Education.

References

Antlej, K. (2015). “Inspired by Tradition: Exploring 3D Food Printing”. Slovenian Australian Cook Hub, May 19, 2015. Consulted August 7, 2015. Available at https://slovenianaustraliancookhub.wordpress.com/2015/05/19/inspired-by-tradition-exploring-3d-food-printing/

Antlej, K., M. Kos & J. Horvat (2013). “3D-tehnologije kot podpora muzejski razstavi industrijskega oblikovanja (3D Technologies as a Support for Industrial Design Museum Exhibition).” Doctoral thesis, University of Ljubljana.

Antlej, K., & S. J. Mächtig (2008). “Razvoj industrijsko oblikovanega izdelka z uporabo 3D tehnologij (The Development of an Industrially Designed Product through the Use of 3D Technologies).” Masters thesis, University of Ljubljana.

Alec (2015). “Pasta maker Barilla to show off its 3D pasta printer at the Milan EXPO 2015”. 3ders, May 5, 2015. Consulted August 7, 2015. Available at http://www.3ders.org/articles/20150505-pasta-maker-barilla-to-show-off-its-3d-pasta-printer-at-the-milan-expo-2015.html

Biggs, J. (2015). “Bocusini Will 3D Print Your Food Like A Fine Robotic Pastry Chef”. TechCrunch, May 18, 2015. Consulted August 7, 2015. Available at http://techcrunch.com/2015/05/18/bocusini-will-3d-print-your-food-like-a-fine-robotic-pastry-chef/

Bodey, M. (2015). “MKR cooks TV’s second best audience of 2015”. The Australian, Business Review, May 5, 2015. Consulted August 10, 2015. Available at http://www.theaustralian.com.au/business/media/mkr-cooks-tvs-second-best-audience-of-2015/story-e6frg996-1227336467108

Cohen D.L., Lipton, J., Cutler, M., Coulter, D., Vesco, A. & Lipson, H. (2009). “Hydrocolloid Printing: A Novel Platform for Customized Food Production.” In Solid freeform fabrication proceedings, 20th Solid Freeform Fabrication Symposium (SFF’09). Austin, Texas. 807–818. Consulted August 7, 2015. Available at http://creativemachines.cornell.edu/sites/default/files/SFF09_Cohen1_0.pdf

Dougherty, D. (2013). “The Maker Mindset.” In M. Honey & D. E. Kanter (ed.). Design, Make, Play: Growing the Next Generation of STEM Innovators. New York: Routledge, 7–11.

Društvo ljubiteljev potice. Consulted August 10, 2015. Available at http://www.potice.si/

EXPO 2015. Consulted August 7, 2015. Available at http://www.expo2015.org/en

Khot, R.A., R. Pennings & F. F. Mueller (2015). “EdiPulse: Supporting Physical Activity with Chocolate Printed Messages”. In B. Begole, J. Kim, K. Inkpen & W. Woo (eds.). Proceedings of the 33rd Annual ACM Conference Extended Abstracts on Human Factors in Computing Systems, Seoul, CHI 2015 Extended Abstracts, Republic of Korea, April 18 – 23, 2015. 1391–1396. Consulted August 7, 2015. Available at http://exertiongameslab.org/wp-content/uploads/2011/07/edipulse_wip_chi2015.pdf

Kinski, K. (2013). “Eat the Collection @ The Powerhouse Museum”. Design Federation, May 10, 2013. Consulted August 7, 2015. Available at http://www.designfederation.net/events-exhibitions/eat-the-collection-the-powerhouse-museum/

Lipson, H. & M. Kurman (2013). Fabricated: The New World of 3D Printing. Indianapolis: John Wiley & Sons, 134.

Lipton, J., D. Arnold, F. Nigl, N. Lopez, D.L. Cohen, N. Noren, & H. Lipson (2010). “Multi-Material Food Printing with Complex Internal Structure Suitable for Conventional Post-Processing.” In Solid freeform fabrication proceedings, 21st Solid Freeform Fabrication Symposium (SFF’10). Austin, Texas. 809–815. Consulted August 7, 2015. Available at http://creativemachines.cornell.edu/sites/default/files/69-Lipton-Mutlimaterial%20food%20printing%20Final.pdf

Malnick, E. (2014). “BBC’s Bake Off draws greater audience than World Cup final”. The Telegraph, October 9, 2014. Consulted August 12, 2015. Available at http://www.telegraph.co.uk/culture/tvandradio/great-british-bake-off/11150740/More-tune-into-Great-British-Bake-Off-than-World-Cup-final.html

Merritt, E. (2015). “Beyond the Walls: A conversation with Peter Kim about creating a museum of food and community”, Museum, May/June, 2015, 43–49.

Molitch-Hou, M. (2015). “The Foodini 3D Food Printer Hits Kickstarter!”, 3D Printing Industry, March 31, 2014. Consulted August 7, 2015. Available at http://3dprintingindustry.com/2014/03/31/3d-printer-foodini-food-kickstarter/

National Museum of Australia. Food Stories. Consulted August 7, 2015. Available at http://www.nma.gov.au/online_features/food_stories

National Museum of Australia. Urban Farming and the Agricultural Show. Consulted August 7, 2015. Available at http://www.nma.gov.au/online_features/urban_farming_agricultural_show/home

NEW INC. Consulted August 7, 2015. Available at http://www.newinc.org/

Ngo, D. (2015). “3D Systems unveils ChefJet 3D printers for those with a sweet tooth”, CNET, January 7, 2015. Consulted August 7, 2015. Available at http://www.cnet.com/products/3d-systems-chefjet-3d-printer/

Razboršek, I. (1992). Slovenska krasilna umetnost. Celje: Mohorjeva družba.

Senese, M. (2015). “Custom Flapjacks are Finally Here: PancakeBot Comes to Kickstarter”. Make:, April 8, 2015. Consulted August 7, 2015. Available at http://makezine.com/2015/04/08/pancakebot-kickstarter/

Seraph Robotics. Consulted August 10, 2015. Available at http://www.scientist3d.com/

Cite as:
Antlej, Kaja and Angelina Russo. “Museums as creative labs: 3D food printing inspired by culinary heritage in the context of makerspaces.” MWA2015: Museums and the Web Asia 2015. Published MM DD, YYYY. Consulted MM DD, YYYY.
http://mwa2015.museumsandtheweb.com/paper/museums-as-creative-labs-3d-food-printing-inspired-by-culinary-heritage-in-the-context-of-makerspaces/

Learning Slovenian and Making Dražgoše Honeybread

As pointed out in one of the previous posts, learning a language can also be fun, creative… and delicious.

Usually every Saturday, Sarah, Jana, Kate and Frank, a group of Slovenian Australians from Melbourne gets together to learn Slovenian language with a help of Draga Gelt, a long-time teacher who almost twenty years led and taught at the school of the Slovenian Association Melbourne. 10 years she taught at a high school level at the Saturday School of Modern Languages.

It was a pleasant experience to join Sarah, Jana, Kate, Frank and Draga at one of their language lessons. This time, inspired by the Slovenian strive to the proclamation of World Bee Day within the framework of the United Nations and in connection with the Cook Hub project, the topic was related to honey.

Following the concept learning-by-doing, the participants have learned Slovenian nouns with adverbs for cooking utensils, tools,  ingredients and dishes as well as verbs used to make Dražgoše honeybread, a traditional Slovenian decorated bread. At the end, all went home with new knowledge, experience and their own honey heart.

It is not an easy way to follow a recipe in Slovenian – but it’s fun! 😉

Here you can read more about Draga’s language courses.

If anyone wants to try making Dražgoše honeybread, below is the RECIPE borrowed from www.slovenijanadlani.si/drazgoski-medeni-kruhki:

Dražgoški medeni kruhki

Dražgoški medeni kruhki niso samo značilna jed, so tudi prijetni na pogled in seveda zanimivi. Najbolje jo seveda pripravijo domačinke, če pa se želite tudi sami poizkusiti v pripravi, je tukaj recept.

Za pripravo jedi dražgoški medeni kruhki za osnovno testo potrebujete:

– Med (1 kg)
– Ržena moka (1,5 kg)
– Jelenova sol (15 g)
– Voda (0,5 dl)
– Mleti cimet (1 žlička)
– Mleti klinčki (1 žlička)

Za testo za okrasitev dražgoških medenih kruhkov potrebujete:

– Med (500g)
– Pšenična moka (700g)
– Jelenova sol (7 g)
– Voda (0,25 dl)
– Ščep mletega cimeta
– Ščep mletih klinčkov

V ponvi segrejemo med. Pred tem pa v večji posodi zamešamo rženo moko, mlete klinčke in mleti cimet. Sol stopimo v vodi in jo z medom, ki smo ga segreli dodamo drugim sestavinam. Vse sestavine zgnetemo v gosto in gladko testo.
Celoten postopek se ponovi, ko pripravljamo testo za okrasitev medenih kruhkov.

Testo nato na podlagi, ki smo jo pomokali razvaljamo, nato pa si izberemo obliko in jo izrežemo. Robove po želji okrasimo. Kruhke po tem, ko smo izrezali oblike premažemo s hladno vodo. Iz testa za okraske naredimo poljubne vzorce (rože, srčki, vitice …) in z njimi okrasimo z vodo premazane kruhke.

Namažemo pekač in okrašene medene kruhke postavimo na pekač. Pečico pred tem ogrejemo na 165°C in pustimo peči od 10 do 15 minut. Ko so kruhki pečeni jih še premažemo s toplim prelivom, ki ga naredimo tako, da segrejemo vodo in v njen žlico medu. Dražgoški medeni kruhki dobijo svetleč sijaj.

Dražgoški medeni kruhki so primerni kot posladek ali pa kot darilo za vaše najdražje. Priprava je tudi odlična za zabavo z otroki. Pa dober tek!

INVITATION: Join the Welcome Dinner Project

A broad idea of the Slovenian Australian Cook Hub research project is to extend this platform to future cross-cultural hubs working jointly towards a harmonious and creative multicultural Australian society. In order to achieve common goals we are happy to spread a message of similar initiatives.

Therefore, we are inviting a broader Slovenian Australian community to join the Welcome Dinner Project, an initiative of joiningthedots which connects newly arrived people with established Australians over pot-luck dinners in local homes.

It all began in March 2013 and since then the initiative has taken off right around the country. It’s about creating a space where people come together across cultures over a shared meal to form friendships and networks.

The next event will take place on Sunday 26th July in Canberra. Below you will find more information about the project and how you can join as facilitators.

The Welcome Dinner Project is launching in Canberra very soon and to get things off the ground they need a team of volunteers who help facilitate the dinners. There’s a training day for people interested in becoming a Welcome Dinner Facilitator coming up on Sunday 26th July from 10:30am-4pm in Canberra in the city centre. Full details about the location, what to expect and to bring will be sent out to people who register for the training.

What do Welcome Dinner Facilitators do?
The Welcome Dinner Project relies on volunteer Welcome Dinner Project facilitators to create successful experiences where people come together across cultures over a shared meal. The volunteer Welcome Dinner Project facilitator plays a key role in ensuring the effectiveness of this project by creating a safe, welcoming and comfortable environment. At every dinner, two facilitators hold a space for all participants to be able to bring something to the table through a series of ritualised activities and helps to get interaction flowing between Welcome Dinner hosts and attendees.

What’s involved?
You will need to complete the 1-Day Welcome Dinner Facilitator training workshop run by joiningthedots. After successful completion of the training you will assist a lead facilitator to facilitate Welcome Dinners until you are ready to step into the lead facilitator role yourself. The date and time of each Welcome Dinner is determined by the Welcome Dinner hosts and attendees in conjunction with the availability of the facilitators. Dinners usually begin in the evening between 6pm and 7pm and conclude by 8pm-9pm, although some prefer to have a lunchtime gathering.

How much time is expected?
After completing your Welcome Dinner Facilitator training the organiser ask that you commit to facilitating approximately one Welcome Dinner every 2 or 3 months, depending on how many are organised in the region you are assigned as well as attending shorter supplementary trainings and facilitator catch ups several times a year. You are also invited to assist with promotions, for example reaching out to local English classes and help where possible with preparations in the lead up to dinners you’re facilitating.

APPLY HERE or send an expression of interest to admin@joiningthedots.org. Please apply or email by Friday 17th July.

Please also help spread the word by forwarding this message to others who might be interested.

The Slovenian Association Melbourne: A Museum, Archive, Library and a School

The Slovenian Association Melbourne was founded in 1954 in Carlton as one of the first Slovenian clubs in Melbourne. In 1972, a property on the Eltham hills in Research was acquired. Among the club house with dining room and ballroom, hunters and anglers lodge, indoor bocce arena and outdoor BBQ area, the Association comprises a museum, library of about 3,000 books, the Historical Archive for Slovenian Australians (HASA) in Victoria and the youth club with a school.

All of them, the youth club, archive, museum and the library keep in their collections not only the Association’s heritage, but also a rich history of Slovenians across whole Australia. Different objects related to food traditions, such as pottery, glassware, cookbooks and other publications as well as a large range of photographic material recording traditional festivities, are presented as well. Some of the material was produced in Australia, however there is also a numerous objects brought from Slovenia.

Nevertheless the archive became an independent entity already in September 1998, both the museum and the archive were officially open on 29 November  2014. The library was open already on 20 November 1983.

In collaboration with the Museum Victoria in partnership with Museums Australia (Victoria), the Association is also represented on the Victorian Collections website, “a showcase of cultural artefacts held by many hundreds of organisations distributed across the State of Victoria in Australia.” Currently 250 items can be explored.

More about the club can be also read on Sloveniana: Slovenian Heritage Trails.

All the photos in the album were taken on 18 June 2015.

Project Presentation at Sts. Cyril and Methodius Mission Kew – Melbourne

 

On Sunday 7 June 2015, after the Feast of the Body of Christ procession, the Slovenian Australian Cook Hub – Culinary Heritage of Slovenian Australians research project was presented at Sts. Cyril and Methodius Mission Kew – Melbourne.

The presentation was organised in cooperation with Sts. Cyril and Methodius Mission Kew – Melbourne and the University of Canberra. A 2015 Endeavour Research Fellowship (Postdoctoral Research) is provided by the Australian Government Department of Education.

I would like to thank Father Ciril A. Božič OFM, OAM for giving me the opportunity to present the project and all the participants for attending the presentation and for interesting discussions about the Slovenian culinary traditions in Australia. Thank you also for deliceous Kranjska klobasa, pražen/tenstan/restan krompir in kislo zelje…in rdeče vino (Kransky sausage, sautéed potatoes with onions and sauerkraut…and red wine).

Regards,
Kaja

HASA NSW – Historical Archives for Slovenian Australians – NSW

The HASA NSW Historical Archives for Slovenian Australians is a principal institution dedicated to preservation of the Slovenian cultural heritage in New South Wales. The archives, registered in 2003, is located at the St. Raphael Slovenian Mission building in Merrylands, Sydney.

Project Presentation at St. Raphael Slovenian Mission Merrylands – Sydney

On Sunday 31 May 2015 the Slovenian Australian Cook Hub – Culinary Heritage of Slovenian Australians research project was presented at St. Raphael Slovenian Mission Merrylands – Sydney.

The event was organised in cooperation with St. Raphael Slovenian Mission Merrylands – Sydney and the University of Canberra. A 2015 Endeavour Research Fellowship (Postdoctoral Research) is provided by the Australian Government Department of Education.

I would like to thank Father Darko Žnidaršič OFM for giving me the opportunity to present the project, Florjan Auser for technical support and all the participants for attending the presentation and for an interesting discussion about the Slovenian culinary traditions in Australia. Thank you also for sharing with me all your little secrets for making a perfect and healthy potica.

See more photos in the article on the St. Raphael Slovenian Mission website.

Regards,
Kaja

Photos: Florjan Auser, Kaja Antlej